Elderflower Smash

elderflower smash recipeI was given a review copy of Rachael Ray’s new book My Year in Meals. It is an inside look at what Rachael and her husband cook in their home every night. I am amazed at how Rachael spends her entire day cooking and comes home to to cook dinner almost every single night. You would think that she would order in or eat out every night. I know that some days I feel like that, I spend so much time in the kitchen that I feel like I couldn’t cook another thing. Rachael documented what she cooked for her friends and family over the course of one year. The photos are taken by her and her husband and it is a really fun look into her life.

When you flip the book over, her husband shares a year’s worth of cocktails. I always have half bottles and mini bottles of random things in the liquor cabinet. Not that I am a booze hound or anything, but I do cook with a lot of alcohol. I love how many different kinds of drinks there are in this book. I happen to have some St-Germain mini bottles that I picked up last time I was in the store and this cocktail seemed like the person excuse to break it open.

The book goes on sale today.

elderflower smash recipe4 or 5 mint leaves
2 ounces gin
1 1/2 ounces St-Germain elderflower liqueur
juice of half a lemon
3 dashes of bitters

elderflower smash recipePut all of the ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a cocktail glass.

elderflower smash recipe

Yield: makes 1

Elderflower Smash

Elderflower Smash
Elderflower Smash - A St-Germain and mint gin cocktail. Floral and refreshing on a warm day.

Ingredients

  • 4 or 5 mint leaves
  • 2 ounces gin
  • 1 1/2 ounces St-Germain elderflower liqueur
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 3 dashes of bitters

Instructions

  1. Put all of the ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake well. Strain into a cocktail glass.

Nutrition Information:


Amount Per Serving: Calories: 0 Total Fat: 0g

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4 Comments

      • I think the Peychaud’s bitters, as you pictured, would highlight the floral aspects of the St. Germain better, rather than the heavier, darker Angostura bitters. But worth trying both ways!

        Reply
  • So here is my comment….where are yours?? I read your blog. I get it, you got a free advance copy of the book, great for you! You published their recipe. I read past ALL of your ads….looked twice for your comments on the drink……and still, nothing. No comments on whether or not you tried, liked it, disliked it, nothing. Did I miss something? I promise I won’t miss it again, because….wait for it, I won’t look at your blog again. It’s not worth it if a reader can’t find it!

    Reply

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