Traditional Glogg Recipe

traditional glogg recipe

Traditional Glogg Recipe or Mulled Red Wine is found everywhere in Scandinavia. Spiced and slightly sweet, this warm red wine will keep you warm and cozy.

A few weeks ago, Wes and I took a very quick trip to Copenhagen. I fell in love with Scandinavian life and it is on my list to go back to and get to know even more. Winter and candlelight and warm blankets and all things cozy. I felt very at home there. (#hyggeforlife) While we were there, we walked through Tivoli Gardens. It was decorated for Halloween, but I had my first mulled wine or glogg (pronounced glue-gh) of the season. This one had a heavy pour of Amaretto in it too. It was a really cold night and we were walking around the gorgeous gardens and it felt like a romantic date in a Hallmark movie.

I fell in love with mulled wine a few years ago when my good friend on the Cape made it for me. It is a mulled white wine and I’ve made it more times than I can count. Ironically, she got her recipe from her time living in Stuttgart many years before we lived here. It is riesling-based (not the super sweet kind, but the dry one) and has lots of citrus in it. I love it so much and make it every Halloween.

I am not a big red wine fan, so I assumed that I wouldn’t really like mulled red wine. I was wrong. I’ve made this recipe three times since we got back from Denmark and I foresee buying a bottle of red just about every time I go to the German grocery store. This is a traditional glogg recipe, but there are as many variations as there are Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian grandmothers. I’m sure everyone puts their own spin on it.

traditional glogg recipe

Mine has sliced fresh ginger, some sugar, cardamom pods (be sure to smash them to let the seeds out), orange peel, cinnamon stick, almonds, raisins (I do not like raisins feel like it must be included because every recipe that I found had them in it), cloves, and slivered almonds.

traditional glogg recipe

Add sugar, orange zest, raisins, almonds, cardamom pods, ginger, cinnamon, and cloves to a medium saucepan. Pour in wine.

traditional glogg recipe

Simmer until wine reaches 175°. Or until the sugar has dissolved completely.

Remove from heat and let stand one hour.

traditional glogg recipe

Pour through a sieve. Pour into a bottle for another time or ladle straight in cups.

traditional glogg recipe

How pretty does this look? Even the cooked down spices and peels look gorgeous soaked in wine.

traditional glogg recipe

Garnish with a few raisins, almonds, orange slices, and a cinnamon stick. Optional, but always a good idea, add a splash of amaretto, vodka, or bourbon.

traditional glogg recipe

Traditional Glogg Recipe

Traditional Glogg Recipe

Yield: 4 servings

Traditional Glogg Recipe or Mulled Red Wine is found everywhere in Scandinavia and most parts of Europe in the winter. Spiced and slightly sweet, this will keep you warm and cozy.

Ingredients

  • Traditional Glogg Recipe //
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • Zest from an orange
  • 2 Tablespoons raisins
  • 2 Tablespoons slivered blanched almonds
  • 1 Tablespoon cardamom pods, smashed
  • A fresh pieces of sliced fresh ginger
  • 1 stick cinnamon, broken
  • 8-10 cloves
  • 1 bottle red wine (I use a $9 red blend)
  • Garnish //
  • Sliced orange
  • slivered blanched almonds
  • Cinnamon sticks
  • Raisins
  • Amaretto
  • Bourbon
  • Vodka

Instructions

Add sugar, orange zest, raisins, almonds, cardamom pods, ginger, cinnamon, and cloves to a medium saucepan. Pour in wine.

Simmer until wine reaches 175°. Or until the sugar has dissolved completely.

Remove from heat and let stand one hour.

Pour through a sieve. Pour into a bottle for another time or ladle straight in cups.

Garnish with a few raisins, almonds, orange slices, and a cinnamon stick. Optional, but always a good idea, add a splash of amaretto, vodka, or bourbon.

Notes

I make a batch and keep it in the fridge in a glass bottle. I gently reheat in a small saucepan.

traditional glogg recipe

This Post Has 13 Comments

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  6. Is it a splash of all of them or which ever you prefer?

    1. I like a splash in all of them.

  7. This is NOT original Glogg! My great, great, uncle made it from scratch. The last batch I watched him make was in the 70’s and he was in his 80’s. He could barely speak English and his accent was thick, but his eyes were bright and spirited. He only made it for the Christmas holiday and it included fruits and hard alchohol and port…not red wine. Anyway….the word “traditional” is a little inaccurate. Your concoction sounds good, too, but it ISN”T traditional Glogg.

    1. Well, considering that I got the recipe in Denmark and was inspired by what I drank in Denmark, I would argue that it IS traditional. But like a lot of recipes and traditions, they are different from family to family, but not untraditional. But thanks for the “spirited” and slightly rude comment. Happy Holidays!

    2. i lived in sweden for the past three years – swedish glogg has variations.

      until you find me the book of viking that has the original and only “traditional” glogg recipe of which ye speak , i will go by my experience living in the land itself. that experience is there are variations. most recipes i am aware of are a mixture of port, red wine, cloves, cardamom pods, cinnamon sticks, an orange peel, brandy, sugar, raisins and almonds.

      1. Thank you Framtiden. 🙂

  8. Bree, I gave glogg and mulled wine kits to my girlfriends for Christmas this year. Such a great presentation. They loved it. I mixed up the “tradition” a little and used the Trader Joes Golden Berry mix for the fruit in the glogg.

    I also made your holiday light cupcakes for a friend whose 4 year old daughter asked Santa for Christmas cupcakes. (how cute is that??)
    Thanks for having such great ideas. I love the blog.

    1. This makes me so happy, I am so glad that they liked receiving them. Happy to have you here!

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Oh hey there!

Well, hello there! I’m Bree Hester, the Boston-based blogger and food photographer here at Baked Bree. Here you can get lots of weeknight meal inspiration, eat more plant-based meals, and still indulge in a decadent sweet treat. Baked Bree is a place where you will find great recipes and inspiration for your next family adventure.

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