I'm in!

get access to the resource library!

 Recipes, printables, and more!

to the resource library

Subscribe

contact

blog

recipes

work with me

meet bree

start here

Get cooking!

Orange Marmalade

orange marmalade recipeI have been intrigued by this recipe for some time. I saw Ina make it on her show and she made it look so easy. Like caramel, I find jams and jellies to be tricky. I needed to make an orange marmalade for my Orange Tian so I deviated a bit from the Daring Baker challenge recipe and used this recipe instead. It worked! I followed the recipe exactly and it really worked! Don’t laugh. I really do get so upset when my jams don’t jell right or my canning doesn’t work. You invest so much time and energy only to be disappointed with the results. While this recipe does take time to make, 2 days to be exact, the actual hands on time is nothing. The most energy expelled is the slicing of the oranges. I also added a split vanilla bean to my marmalade. One, I love the vanilla and orange combination, and two, I thought that pieces of vanilla bean would be gorgeous flecked throughout the jelly. I was right.

4 large seedless oranges (organic would be best here because you are using the whole orange, wash very well)
2 lemons
1 vanilla bean split
8 cups sugar
8 cups water

Cut the oranges and lemons in half and then into paper thin slices. I would have used a mandoline but I couldn’t find the right piece so I just did it by hand. Isn’t that always the way? When you need something you can’t find it?

Put the sliced fruit and all of their juices into a pot. Ina calls for a stainless steel pot, mine were all occupied at the time so I used a cast iron one. Add 8 cups water and bring the mixture to a boil, stirring often. Remove from the heat and stir in the sugar until it dissolves. Add the vanilla bean. Cover and allow to stand at room temperature overnight.

The next day, bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer uncovered for 2 hours. Turn the heat to medium and boil gently, stirring often, for another 30 minutes. Skim off any foam. Cook the marmalade until it reaches 220 degrees on a candy thermometer.

If you want to be doubly sure that that the marmalade is ready, place a small amount on a plate and refrigerate until it is cool. If it is firm (neither too runny or too hard) it is done. It will be a golden orange color. If the marmalade is runny, continue cooking it. If it is too hard, add more water.

Pour the marmalade into clean, hot Mason jars. Wipe the rim thoroughly and seal the lids. Store in the pantry up to one year.

I use orange marmalade all time time. While it is delicious on toast with butter, it is also delicious in salad dressings, marinades, and pan sauces. I think that I have gotten over my fear of jams and jellies. Good thing that spring is in full swing, can’t wait to make another one. How impressed will your friends be when they have you over and you hand them a jar of homemade orange marmalade as a hostess gift?

Print

Ingredients

  • 4 large seedless oranges (organic would be best here because you are using the whole orange, wash very well)
  • 2 lemons
  • 1 vanilla bean split
  • 8 cups sugar
  • 8 cups water

Instructions

  1. Cut the oranges and lemons in half and then into paper thin slices.
  2. Put the sliced fruit and all of their juices into a pot. Ina calls for a stainless steel pot, mine were all occupied at the time so I used a cast iron one. Add 8 cups water and bring the mixture to a boil, stirring often. Remove from the heat and stir in the sugar until it dissolves. Add the vanilla bean. Cover and allow to stand at room temperature overnight.
  3. The next day, bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer uncovered for 2 hours. Turn the heat to medium and boil gently, stirring often, for another 30 minutes. Skim off any foam. Cook the marmalade until it reaches 220 degrees on a candy thermometer.
  4. If you want to be doubly sure that that the marmalade is ready, place a small amount on a plate and refrigerate until it is cool. If it is firm (neither too runny or too hard) it is done. It will be a golden orange color. If the marmalade is runny, continue cooking it. If it is too hard, add more water.
  5. Pour the marmalade into clean, hot Mason jars. Wipe the rim thoroughly and seal the lids.
* indicates required

the baked bree newsletter

sign up for

share

share

share

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. Mandy

    April 5th, 2010 at 1:19 pm

    Beautiful! I never knew marmalade could be so easy! This will be a definite must-try for this summer. Thanks!

  2. Brenda Bisharat

    April 5th, 2010 at 2:28 pm

    Well, I would like to make the comment that I was one of the lucky ones to receive a jar of this! I used some of it to make a salad dressing for a wonderful tossed green salad for Easter. I even took your suggestion and I went to the Farmers Market on Saturday morning (our local one, not Davis) and got some very lovely fresh greens…..it was splendid and the entire salad was gone!…..THANK YOU my BFF….

  3. Memoria

    April 5th, 2010 at 8:31 pm

    I love that you didn’t have to use pectin!! This looks great!!

  4. Lisa

    April 8th, 2010 at 4:53 pm

    I have a blood orange tree that is loaded with fruit right now and regular navel oranges as well. This recipe is just what I have been looking for! I can’t wait to get started. I also have meyer lemons that I’m going to experiment with. Thanks for all the tips!

  5. Cindy

    April 9th, 2010 at 6:47 pm

    I just remembered reading a chapter in Mouth Wide Open by John Thorne that was all about orange marmalade. Apparently, there’s a lot of history behind those little jars of maralade and Thorne has gone to great lengths to replicate “authentic” marmalade. Sounds like the real stuff is extremely bitter and nasty. Anyway, blah blah blah. Like your blog. Esp the chicken nugget piece. It inspires me to voice some of my own food opinons on my blog.
    Thanks and have a lovely weekend!

  6. axel g

    May 26th, 2010 at 9:56 am

    That’s a nice recipe with many beautiful pics!

    I love marmalade on freshly baked bread +_+

  7. bakedbree

    May 26th, 2010 at 1:00 pm

    thank you. I need to make some homemade bread soon.

  8. Despina

    June 2nd, 2010 at 2:00 pm

    It looks delicious. I make orange marmalade very often but I had never thought of adding vanilla bean. I will try it. Thanks

  9. bakedbree

    June 3rd, 2010 at 9:57 pm

    I really like the creamsicle flavor so I thought that it would be good here and thankfully, it turned out delicious. Keep me posted on how yours turns out.

  10. JBE

    June 22nd, 2010 at 9:54 am

    Just curious…what was your canning processing time for this? How many minutes did you process them in a water bath?

  11. bakedbree

    June 23rd, 2010 at 9:02 am

    I did not can it. I kept it in the fridge.

  12. Kimberly

    February 18th, 2014 at 1:34 pm

    I would ask that you go back and explain that you have stored this in the fridge. Many beginning jam makers may find your blog and assume that sealing the jars means it is now safe to stick on a shelf.

    Thanks for helping!!

  13. Maceo

    December 21st, 2010 at 9:35 pm

    This recipe sounds great! How many jars did you make? I am thinking of using this recipe.

  14. bakedbree

    December 22nd, 2010 at 9:48 pm

    I think 4 jars.

  15. Lynn

    January 13th, 2011 at 8:19 am

    I’ve been told keeping a lot of the pith and membranes in the jam make the end product bitter. Many of the recipes tell you to either juice or segment the oranges then put the pith and seeds in a cheese cloth, using only a smaller amount of peel that’s had the white part cut off. I haven’t made orange marmalade yet but am searching for a technique.

    Sounds like your batch keeping all these items in turned out great. Curious what you’ve heard or learned with your process Bree!

  16. bakedbree

    January 17th, 2011 at 7:38 pm

    I just bought a beautiful book called the Blue Chair Jam Cookbook, they are based out of Oakland and they have classes. I really want to learn to make jams and jellies well.

  17. Holly

    October 14th, 2013 at 9:12 am

    I’ve read that in my research to. I also read that boiling it takes away a lot of the bitterness and the sugar balances it out. I will be starting this today after some yard work, but cutting recipe in half because I only bought two oranges lol. It’s not something I keep in stock regularly only because orange juice has too much acid for my stomach liking, but I hoping I can enjoy it in a marmalade.

  18. Sue

    February 7th, 2011 at 12:16 am

    Hi Bree,

    I made this over the weekend. Used organic oranges from Italy (a little like navels). The result is absolutely delicious! I used up a jar of vanilla sugar – about 2 cups – in which I had vanilla beans sitting for a couple of months. Lovely subtle but definite vanilla flavour. Don’t change a thing. There is a little bitterness, but that’s what makes orange marmalade orange marmalade. Those who don’t like it should make orange jam without peel, but it won’t be marmalade!
    Can’t stop eating the darn stuff 🙂

  19. bakedbree

    February 7th, 2011 at 11:01 pm

    I am so happy to hear this. I love making it. I recently got a great book called the Blue Chair Jam Cookbook, amazing marmalade recipes to try.

  20. Ro

    June 12th, 2011 at 7:06 pm

    Great looking recipe – I really love that you have included pics at every step of the way!

    I’m about to give this recipe a try – Has anyone tried making it without leaving it to stand overnight? (I need to finish it today!)

  21. bakedbree

    June 13th, 2011 at 7:35 am

    It needs to stand overnight to develop the pectin. If you are in hurry, I would tray different recipe.

  22. Treena

    September 24th, 2011 at 6:08 pm

    fabulous recipe, just made marmalade for all for xmas. What an easy recipe and guess what it set for me which i always have difficulty with,

  23. bakedbree

    September 25th, 2011 at 6:45 pm

    That is great Treena!

  24. Shannon Marmolejo

    November 9th, 2011 at 2:51 pm

    How did you seal the Mason jars after you put the marmalade in? I want to be able to make a large batch and store for the year, while being mindful of bacteria and such. Thanks!

  25. bakedbree

    November 13th, 2011 at 8:48 pm

    I would consult the Ball website. I have never canned it, and am not comfortable giving information on canning.

  26. lorie

    November 16th, 2011 at 3:30 pm

    your recipe says to seal the jar. Do you mean in boiling water? Is it ok to just put in a jar and refrigerate?

  27. bakedbree

    November 16th, 2011 at 11:31 pm

    Yes it is, I am not comfortable giving canning directions. Please refer to the ball website for instructions.

  28. Tanya

    November 23rd, 2011 at 4:01 pm

    I love orange marmalade and this looks fantastic. I’d really like to make it since the oranges are so awesome at the farmer’s market right now. One quick question – I’m not familiar with canning jams or jellies – you don’t need to process this in order for it to keep for a year? Thanks!

  29. bakedbree

    November 24th, 2011 at 12:19 pm

    Yes you do, I am not comfortable with canning, so I do not give specifics on how to do it. If you want to, I would try an find a reliable source and follow those directions.

  30. Kimberly

    February 18th, 2014 at 1:37 pm

    I know this is from a long time ago, but in case someone new stumbles upon this post… The National Center for Home Food Preservation is THE resource when it comes to following tested methods for home food preservation. https://nchfp.uga.edu/

  31. Chris Florida

    February 5th, 2012 at 3:54 pm

    That sounds like a lot of trouble. Down here in Florida I make my own from my own tree oranges. Just wash an orange cut it in quatres and throw the whole thing in a food processor and chop until you see small pieces . Make sure your oranges are thinnner skinned. Ornages and Lemons have tons of pectin in them so no need to use Surejell etc… Take a 1/2 a cup of sugar and 2 tablespoons of water and throw the orange pulp in the pot with the sugar and water and stir constantly over a gentle boil for about 15-18 minutes. It should already harden up nice and firm. Grab a chair if you cannot stand stirring for 15. Then just jar them up in some olsd jars with lids. Bleah or a dishwasher will santize them just fine. Best Ornage marmalade you ever had. Just enough swee and bitter. They kill for it in The UK!

  32. bakedbree

    February 9th, 2012 at 3:36 pm

    All jams and jellies are a lot of trouble. I am not really sure how our methods are that different, but I do need to be concerned with using old jars. That is a food safety issue.

  33. stephanie

    April 10th, 2013 at 8:34 pm

    Chris Florida – is that for 1 orange?

  34. JDC

    February 18th, 2012 at 10:13 am

    Hi Bree,
    I wrote you from Madrid (Spain). I’ve done this recipe this saturday, with oranges and lemons from my parents’s garden, from in Portugal. I’m an “aficionado” of Orange Marmalade and this recipe is really simple and the result simply Amazing! Thanks for sharing it! I think i’ll never bought commercial one….

  35. bakedbree

    February 18th, 2012 at 7:47 pm

    Thank you JDC! I wish that I were in Madrid right now! I am glad that you like this recipe so much.

  36. Carol Ann

    February 20th, 2012 at 5:21 pm

    Don’t you have to put them in a waterbath for 5 minutes or so.? I’ve never made jam that sat on the shelf without the water bath…

    Just asking

    Carol Ann

  37. bakedbree

    February 21st, 2012 at 12:07 pm

    It is what the recipe states from Ina. Honestly, I am not comfortable sharing canning recipes so I would keep it in the fridge.

  38. Courtney

    August 5th, 2012 at 10:51 pm

    Hi, really like your blog- I have a friend that went to Scotland and stayed at a b&b where the innkeeper had made his own marmalade with scotch whisky added. I was a little intrigued, and wondered when you thought one should add a couple teaspoons of it. I think I would omit the vanilla, but definitely would like to try your original recipe on my next batch.

  39. bakedbree

    August 6th, 2012 at 10:49 am

    I would add it at the very end. I would also keep the vanilla. Whiskey and vanilla are amazing together.

  40. Jessica

    November 15th, 2012 at 12:42 am

    Sorry to repeat the question so many have asked but I’m confused. Do you need to go through the canning process, and you are not comfortable giving the instructions? Or can you skip the canning and just store this in the fridge?

    I don’t need to keep this in the pantry for a year, but it seems like if I leave the oranges out overnight and don’t go through the canning process there might be bacteria. Just want to be sure. Thanks!!

  41. bakedbree

    November 18th, 2012 at 4:54 pm

    I am not comfortable giving the instructions. It can store in the fridge.

  42. Pat Ung

    January 4th, 2013 at 8:05 am

    Hello Bree!

    Is it that easy?
    I’ll try it!
    Thanks so much.

    Pat.DessertsLover – Thailand

  43. bakedbree

    January 14th, 2013 at 9:46 pm

    Yes it is.

  44. Donalda

    January 22nd, 2013 at 7:17 pm

    This looks soooo good and I don’t even like marmalade!! Lol! But I am going to make I! Thanks for the beautiful post with amazing pics! Do you know how it would turn out with a sugar substitute? I would love to make this for my brother in law who is diabetic. Once again thanks for the beautiful recipe!!

  45. bakedbree

    January 22nd, 2013 at 10:55 pm

    I would not attempt to make a marmalade with a sugar substitute. I don’t think that it would work.

  46. laura

    February 11th, 2013 at 5:27 pm

    okay for all he I want to knows’s….
    sterilize jars
    heat lids and screw caps in hot water to sterilize
    fill jars
    leave head space
    wipe rim
    scre on lids but not to tight
    place in water bath canner
    make sure water covers jars
    when water boils
    water bath can them for 10 minutes
    remove and cool
    will store on shelf for one year and probably longer

  47. bakedbree

    February 13th, 2013 at 12:30 pm

    I appreciate you taking the time to write this, but my point was that I am not comfortable sharing a canning recipe unless I tried it myself. I have not canned this marmalade, therefore I did not feel that I could say for sure how to do it. I know that not every jam and jelly cans the same way and I prefer not to share something unless I have tested it myself.

  48. stephanie

    April 10th, 2013 at 7:21 pm

    It did not thicken…gently boiled for an hour. Any suggestions???

  49. bakedbree

    April 11th, 2013 at 11:14 pm

    I wish that I could help, but I don’t know what went wrong.

  50. Holly

    October 14th, 2013 at 9:17 am

    I was just resting Ina’s recipe for this! A few weeks ago I made my first strawberry raspberry jam. It ended up being slightly more tart then sweet because I was being gentle on the sugar intake but wanted to follow the recipe closely as possible and figured once I mastered it, then I can play around. I don’t normally eat or drink oranges because the acid can be rough on my stomach, but I think I’m gonna try this because I bought two navel oranges for this purpose and will cut the ingredients in half. I was proud of myself also for canning and getting it right the first time. I see in the thread people have had issues with it. I think the trick is to make sure the cans are covered at least an inch or two under water and boil high for 15 to 25 minutes. Thanks for the recipe, I don’t have a vanilla bean but I do have the extract!

  51. bakedbree

    October 20th, 2013 at 10:07 pm

    Hope it turns out for you!

  52. Priscilla

    December 9th, 2013 at 4:02 pm

    I can’t wait to try this recipe. How many jars were you able to fill with the marmalade? Ounces in jar?

  53. bakedbree

    December 14th, 2013 at 5:21 pm

    Please check the source link. I made this almost 4 years ago, I don’t really remember exactly.

  54. Chris

    October 14th, 2015 at 4:37 pm

    I’ve made this recipe a couple of times and love spicy jellies. i added 1 habanero pepper (took out the seeds) to my batch. It added a nice heat and the color of the pepper doesn’t interfere with the color of the marmalade. I plan on making some this fall, all my friends love it too.

  55. bakedbree

    October 15th, 2015 at 11:54 am

    That sounds delicious. I love a spicy jelly too.

  56. Classic Orange Rolls • Longbourn Farm

    March 27th, 2018 at 4:31 pm

    […] comes from orange marmalade. I just purchase this, but homemade would be AMAZING! This homemade orange marmalade recipe looked […]

  57. Isabel

    January 5th, 2019 at 1:15 pm

    I have made this twice now and it’s a lovely marmalade. Smells are sweet and fragrant in the kitchen. Thanks

  58. bakedbree

    January 6th, 2019 at 1:56 pm

    You are very welcome. Thank Ina. 🙂

* indicates required

Click below to join the newsletter & gain access to subscriber only recipes, printables, and lists

the resource library

receive access to