Passover Brisket Recipe (Jewish Brisket)

I love Passover dinner. When I lived near my family it was one of my favorite holiday meals and this Jewish brisket recipe is a fantastic choice to make for that dinner!

What is Passover Brisket? //

Passover Brisket is a very popular Jewish beef brisket dish of Ashkenazi origin, it should be served nicely hot and can be typically accompanied by potato kugel. It is a very popular Jewish dish in the United States. We propose this delicious Passover brisket recipe and to serve as in the picture above.

Jewish Brisket Ingredients //

  • 1 – 3.5 pound brisket
  • 3 onions sliced thin
  • 3/4 cup chili sauce
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 4 Tablespoons brown sugar
  • 3 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 3 cloves chopped garlic
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • salt and pepper

How to Make // The Steps

Step 1:

Mix all of the sauce ingredients together. Give it a taste. It should be a good balance of sweet and sour. If it needs more sweet, add more sugar, if it needs more sour, add more vinegar. Season well.

I made this one with a beautiful, fancy, Kobe brisket, but any good beef brisket will do. Brisket is from the front part of beef, so as New York Times reporter Julia Moskin said: “Brisket is implicitly kosher since it’s from the front of the animal”.

Step 2:

Pat dry. This is a very important step. The beef needs to be very dry before it goes into the pan. If it is wet, it will steam instead of sear which is what you want. Season with salt and pepper right before you sear it. Crank up the heat in your pan and add a little oil. It needs to be screaming hot before the beef goes in. We are after a nice crispy crust on the outside of our brisket.

Step 3:

When both sides are seared put it in your roasting pan.

Step 4:

Pour the sauce all over the brisket.

Step 5:

Cover the brisket with the sliced onions.

Step 6:

Add a few sprigs of thyme and season with salt and pepper.

Step 7:

Cover with tin foil. I have a lid for this roasting pan. In fact, this is my favorite roasting vesicle, but my mom and my grandmother, and Rose Zawid, who made many, many of our Passover dinners always covered the brisket in tin foil. I do not mess with tradition. I do as I am told.

Step 8:

Put the brisket in a 300 degree oven. I hesitate to give an exact time as it depends on how large your brisket is. Mine was 3.5 pounds and it cooked for almost 3 hours. Brisket should be fork tender. If it is not fork tender, put it back in the oven until it is.

Let your house permeate with the most delicious aroma. Get on with the other parts of your meal.

Step 9:

Let it rest a bit before you cut it. Slice on the bias against the grain. This is very important. If you cut with the grain, you will lost the texture of the brisket and it will be tough. This brisket was tender and succulent and all around delicious. This can be made a day ahead of time. In fact, I recommend that you do make it in advance. It will be even better the second day.

I served this with smashed potatoes, steamed asparagus, thyme and white wine carrots, matzah and homemade haroset.

This is so good that I will not be saving this dish for Passover. Make one and share it with your friends.

Passover dinner (Jewish brisket)

Passover Brisket (Jewish Brisket)

Yield: serves 6
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 3 hours
Total Time: 3 hours 15 minutes

Passover Brisket - my grandmother's family recipe. A sweet and savory brisket that your family will love. This couldn't be easier to make. Mix the sauce, pour it on the brisket, and let the oven do the work.

Ingredients

  • 1 – 3.5 pound brisket
  • 3 onions sliced thin
  • 3/4 cup chili sauce
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 4 Tablespoons brown sugar
  • 3 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 3 cloves chopped garlic
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • salt and pepper

Instructions

  1. Mix all of the sauce ingredients together. Give it a taste. It should be a good balance of sweet and sour. If it needs more sweet, add more sugar, if it needs more sour, add more vinegar. Season well.
  2. Pat brisket dry. This is a very important step. The beef needs to be very dry before it goes into the pan. If it is wet, it will steam instead of sear which is what you want. Season with salt and pepper right before you sear it. Crank up the heat in your pan and add a little oil. It needs to be screaming hot before the beef goes in. We are after a nice crispy crust on the outside of our brisket.
  3. When both sides are seared put it in your roasting pan.
  4. Pour the sauce all over the brisket.
  5. Cover the brisket with the sliced onions.
  6. Add a few sprigs of thyme and season with salt and pepper.
  7. Cover with tin foil. I have a lid for this roasting pan. In fact, this is my favorite roasting vesicle, but my mom and my grandmother, and Rose Zawid, who made many, many of our Passover dinners always covered the brisket in tin foil. I do not mess with tradition. I do as I am told.
  8. Put the brisket in a 300 degree oven. I hesitate to give an exact time as it depends on how large your brisket is. Mine was 3.5 pounds and it cooked for almost 3 hours. Brisket should be fork tender. If it is not fork tender, put it back in the oven until it is.
  9. Let it rest a bit before you cut it. Slice on the bias against the grain. This is very important. If you cut with the grain, you will lost the texture of the brisket and it will be tough. This brisket was tender and succulent and all around delicious. This can be made a day ahead of time. In fact, I recommend that you do make it in advance. It will be even better the second day.
Nutrition Information:
Yield: 6 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 1112Total Fat: 63gSaturated Fat: 25gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 29gCholesterol: 361mgSodium: 768mgCarbohydrates: 23gFiber: 2gSugar: 16gProtein: 100g

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Did you make this recipe?

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My Backstory to this recipe

When my husband and I first started dating he came to my grandparent’s house for Seder and I need to give a little back story here. My mother converted to Judaism when she married my father, she was raised Episcopalian and to this day we celebrate all of the Jewish and Christian holidays. My husband is a Catholic and was a little intimidated by the thought of having to participate in our Seder dinner. Being the nerd that he is, he researched all about Passover and the sequence of events. For years, my mom had been made fun of by my dad’s family for stumbling over the Hebrew when it came time to read her portion of the Haggadah. My mom was thrilled at the idea that some other person was going to get made fun of at our table, but lo and behold, Mr. Google spewed out perfect Hebrew and showed her up. This incident was 7 years ago and she still reminds my husband of it often.

I try to carry on the traditions that I had as a child for my own children and this year I really was urged by Mr. Google to make a Seder dinner. I think that he was just angling for a brisket. We had been in Los Angeles all last week and got home last night so I threw this together this afternoon. I do not have all of the Passover items to have a true Seder dinner, but our dinner had the spirit of Passover. I bought my children this book and they were thrilled that there was Matzoh Man on our table.

I have to give myself some props as I started this dinner at 2pm and had it on the table at 5pm. Granted, I broke the garbage disposal but I will not let that little nugget dampen my victory.

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BakedBree was originally created by Boston-based blogger Bree Hester but is now run by a team of food bloggers with a passion for all things food. Here you can get lots of weeknight meal inspiration, eat more plant-based meals, and still indulge in a decadent sweet treat. Baked Bree is a place where you will find great recipes and inspiration for your next adventure.

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