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I love Passover dinner.  When I lived near my family it was one of my favorite holiday meals.  When my husband and I first started dating he came to my grandparent’s house for Seder.  I need to give a little back story, my mother converted to Judaism when she married my father.  She was raised Episcopalian and to this day we celebrate all of the Jewish and Christian holidays.  My husband is a Catholic and was a little intimidated by the thought of having to participate in our Seder dinner.  Being the nerd that he is, he researched all about Passover and the sequence of events.  For years, my mom had been made fun of by my dad’s family for stumbling over the Hebrew when it came time to read her portion of the Haggadah.  My mom was thrilled at the idea that some other person was going to get made fun of at our table, but lo and behold, Mr. Google spewed out perfect Hebrew and showed her up.  This incident was 7 years ago and she still reminds my husband of it often.

I try to carry on the traditions that I had as a child for my own children and this year I really was urged by Mr. Google to make a Seder dinner.  I think that he was just angling for a brisket.  We had been in Los Angeles all last week and got home last night so I threw this together this afternoon.  I do not have all of the Passover items to have a true Seder dinner, but our dinner had the spirit of Passover.  I bought my children this book and they were thrilled that there was Matzoh Man on our table.

I have to give myself some props as I started this dinner at 2pm and had it on the table at 5pm.  Granted, I broke the garbage disposal but I will not let that little nugget dampen my victory.

I did not use a true recipe for this recipe.  I called my mother and she was less than specific about how to make it.  This is my winging it version.

1 – 3.5 pound brisket
3 onions sliced thin
3/4 cup chili sauce
1/4 cup ketchup
1 cup red wine
4 Tablespoons brown sugar
3 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
3 cloves chopped garlic
1 teaspoon fresh thyme
salt and pepper

Mix all of the sauce ingredients together.  Give it a taste.  It should be a good balance of sweet and sour.  If it needs more sweet, add more sugar, if it needs more sour, add more vinegar.  Season well.

I got fancy, Kobe brisket, but any old brisket will do.

Pat dry.  This is a very important step.  The beef needs to be very dry before it goes into the pan.  If it is wet, it will steam instead of sear which is what you want.  Season with salt and pepper right before you sear it.  Crank up the heat in your pan and add a little oil.  It needs to be screaming hot before the beef goes in.  We are after a nice crispy crust on the outside of our brisket.

When both sides are seared put it in your roasting pan.

Pour the sauce all over the brisket.

Cover the brisket with the sliced onions.

Add a few sprigs of thyme and season with salt and pepper.

Cover with tin foil.  I have a lid for this roasting pan.  In fact, this is my favorite roasting vesicle, but my mom and my grandmother, and Rose Zawid, who made many, many of our Passover dinners always covered the brisket in tin foil.  I do not mess with tradition.  I do as I am told.

Put the brisket in a 300 degree oven.  I hesitate to give an exact time as it depends on how large your brisket is.  Mine was 3.5 pounds and it cooked for almost 3 hours.  Brisket should be fork tender.  If it is not fork tender, put it back in the oven until it is.

Let your house permeate with the most delicious aroma.  Get on with the other parts of your meal.

Let it rest a bit before you cut it.  Slice on the bias against the grain.  This is very important.  If you cut with the grain, you will lost the texture of the brisket and it will be tough.  This brisket was tender and succulent and all around delicious.  This can be made a day ahead of time.  In fact, I recommend that you do make it in advance.  It will be even better the second day.

I served this with smashed potatoes, steamed asparagus, thyme and white wine carrots, matzah and homemade haroset.

This is so good that I will not be saving this dish for Passover.  Make one and share it with your friends.

A little disclaimer – Passover dinner is serious business.  There are very strict rules.  I hope that I followed them correctly, but I make no promises.

Passover Brisket

Ingredients

  • 1 – 3.5 pound brisket
  • 3 onions sliced thin
  • 3/4 cup chili sauce
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 4 Tablespoons brown sugar
  • 3 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 3 cloves chopped garlic
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • salt and pepper

Instructions

  1. Mix all of the sauce ingredients together. Give it a taste. It should be a good balance of sweet and sour. If it needs more sweet, add more sugar, if it needs more sour, add more vinegar. Season well.
  2. Pat brisket dry. This is a very important step. The beef needs to be very dry before it goes into the pan. If it is wet, it will steam instead of sear which is what you want. Season with salt and pepper right before you sear it. Crank up the heat in your pan and add a little oil. It needs to be screaming hot before the beef goes in. We are after a nice crispy crust on the outside of our brisket.
  3. When both sides are seared put it in your roasting pan.
  4. Pour the sauce all over the brisket.
  5. Cover the brisket with the sliced onions.
  6. Add a few sprigs of thyme and season with salt and pepper.
  7. Cover with tin foil. I have a lid for this roasting pan. In fact, this is my favorite roasting vesicle, but my mom and my grandmother, and Rose Zawid, who made many, many of our Passover dinners always covered the brisket in tin foil. I do not mess with tradition. I do as I am told.
  8. Put the brisket in a 300 degree oven. I hesitate to give an exact time as it depends on how large your brisket is. Mine was 3.5 pounds and it cooked for almost 3 hours. Brisket should be fork tender. If it is not fork tender, put it back in the oven until it is.
  9. Let it rest a bit before you cut it. Slice on the bias against the grain. This is very important. If you cut with the grain, you will lost the texture of the brisket and it will be tough. This brisket was tender and succulent and all around delicious. This can be made a day ahead of time. In fact, I recommend that you do make it in advance. It will be even better the second day.
http://bakedbree.com/passover-brisket


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29 Responses to Passover Brisket

  1. Deanna says:

    Sounds good to me! I love a balance of sweet and tangy in any fork tender meat. I’m not even a little bit Jewish so I have no ideas what the rules of Passover are. Do you the brisket braise would work on short ribs? It’s my family’s favorite cut of meat.

    • bakedbree says:

      Absolutely. I think that the braising liquid would be good on just about anything. Not too sweet and not too tangy. I love short ribs too… you have me thinking now….

  2. Kati says:

    You used good Catholic wine though. . . . .

  3. Memoria says:

    I don’t know about the rules of Passover, but this brisket looks delicious. Lovely photos as usual.

  4. Laurie Wagenheim says:

    I’m a little brisket-making shiksa too! Ronnie loves it,so I’ll be blessing him with your recipe tonight. Thanks,Bree!

  5. […] I told you yesterday, I love Passover dinner.  The dessert, not so much.  Since the dietary rules for […]

  6. Sarah says:

    My husband is an Episcopal priest, but we are soooo making this for friends on Monday after Easter. Question: If making this a day ahead, should I separate the meat from the sauce in order to skim it? Did you find it to be greasy or should I just throw the whole thing into the fridge as is and reheat the next day? LOVE your blog.

  7. bakedbree says:

    I have never separated it out before. My husband reheated today and said that it looked like it had separated but once it heated through it was back to normal. I would not separate the braising liquid because I would be afraid that you would lose some moisture. He said that it was not greasy in the least bit. Hope that helps.
    Thank you. I am glad that you like it.

  8. Wow that looks wonderful! Such a colourful plate. I love learning about food traditions of other cultures. Thanks!

  9. Sarah says:

    I meant to let you know, we did make it! And it was awesome! Thanks again for the recipe. However, I must let you know of a little mishap-that-turned-out-great. Chili sauce? I thought. I have some of that left over from when we made something that needed Thai chili sauce…has to basically be the same thing, I’ll just go with that! Yeah, it’s not the same. When I got the brisket out, I tasted one of the onions and liketa burned my mouth up! But here’s the thing: the spiciness did amazing things to the brisket! It was SO good. So I reduced the sauce and added a little half-and-half to cut the spice and poured it all over. Everyone raved. Thank God for happy mistakes, I guess!?

  10. […] the Royal Wedding in mind, but then it struck me that this dessert is Passover perfection.  The Passover meal is one of my favorite meals all year, but the dessert usually lacks.  Without the use of […]

  11. Lori says:

    Sounds wonderful. Looking at the sauce ingredients, I’m just wondering if it tastes like barbecued beef or not so much? I would love a response, but if you don’t I think I’m making it for Easter dinner anyhow since I’m after something different than ham. Thanks!

  12. Lewie says:

    Chili sauce is not kosher for passover because it contains corn syrup. Do you have a substitute?

    • bakedbree says:

      I am not sure to be honest, my grandmother always made hers this way, I guess she was not overly concerned with everything being Kosher for Passover. You could just use wine to cook it in.

  13. Leslie Kelly says:

    I was so glad I stumbled upon your lovely blog and especially this recipe when I was looking for passover brisket recipes. I made it last night for our first Christian Seder at our home, and it was absolutely delicious. I did a few substitutions, using Wochestershire sauce instead of the chili sauce and extra garlic (cause we love it!). I added a bit more wine so the sauce ended up a little soupy-er, but that makes more for me to use today to make a barbeque sauce to use on the leftovers that I am going to “pull” to make sandwiches. Everyone kept saying how delicious it was and I didn’t tell them how easy it was!! I know I am going to find more delicious recipes as I get to know you in your blog. Thanks for sharing!! I have a favorite recipe blog, the Pioneer Woman, but she now has some huge competition! I am a big fan.

  14. Lori says:

    This was very good, but a little too much ketchup flavor for me. I think next time I will tweak it to halve the ketchup and chili sauce and add a little beef broth and Wochestershire.

    I’m with Leslie that your site is right up there with PioneerWoman… and with Smitten Kitchen, I might add. Yours and theirs are my top 3 food blogs that I check regularly now.

    Thanks. Can’t wait to try more recipes!

  15. […] sure that there a million ways to make these more fancy and flavorful, but I like my matzo plain.  I am a traditionalist.  What can I […]

  16. […] chili sauce, thyme and oh so delicious onions make Bree’s mother’s recipe for Baked Bree’s Passover Brisket a go-to recipe favorite any time of year. Oh yeah, take me to […]

  17. […] sure that there a million ways to make these more fancy and flavorful, but I like my matzo plain.  I am a traditionalist.  What can I […]

  18. […] This is incredibly versatile. I have even used leftovers for crazy good tacos. It reminds me of my Passover Brisket, but less […]

  19. […] the Royal Wedding in mind, but then it struck me that this dessert is Passover perfection.  The Passover meal is one of my favorite meals all year, but the dessert usually lacks.  Without the use of […]

  20. […]  Passover Brisket ~ This braised brisket gets a wintery feel from the earthy-sweet flavors of carrots, asparagus and […]

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