Duck Fat Potatoes

Tired of turning out pale, sad roasted potatoes? Try using duck fat to achieve that golden glow and perfect crunch you know you want!

Duck Fat Potatoes featured image

In Asia and continental Europe, duck meat and duck fat have been part of the culinary traditions for many cuisines. However, in American cooking, duck fat in particular has spiked in popularity over the past few decades. Starting in the late twentieth century, it became more available in American markets and chefs and home cooks alike used it to cook steak, fried chicken, homemade potato chips, French fries, and yes, roasted potatoes.

Ducks need an impressive amount of fat in between their skin and their muscles – it is what helps keep them afloat! The fat is dense, rich, and adds a barely-sweet, savory taste to the food it’s used in. Fortunately, it is sold in most grocery stores ready to go – no messy process required. Its high smoke point means it browns and crisps the food its coating without burning. If you haven’t tried using it before, Duck Fat Potatoes is an easy way to cook with duck fat and the results are really impressive.

Impressive? Yes. Visually. Texturally. And most importantly, the flavor. Restaurant-worthy roasted potatoes at home – what could be better? These potatoes look delicious, with their golden color and just-right browned exterior. Without any cloying greasiness. When you bite into one, you will love the crispy outside and soft, roasted inside, where that earthy potato flavor hits your taste buds. These Duck Fat Potatoes may just steal the show from your main dish – they will go fast!

Duck Fat or Goose Fat?

In the ingredients below, we list duck fat OR goose fat if preferred. So what’s the difference? Besides the obvious. Geese are basically just larger ducks and the two fats are mostly interchangeable. However, some people prefer the slightly less gamey taste of duck fat. Ducks and geese eat different things, so it’s natural that the fat from the two animals would taste different. In this recipe, they both achieve the same result with the potatoes, so availability and preference can dictate.

Ingredients

  • 3.5 to 4 pounds of Yukon Gold or Russet potatoes peeled and cut into 3-inch chunks
  • 1 tablespoon of table salt for boiling
  • 2 tablespoons of semolina for coating
  • 1.5 teaspoons of kosher salt for seasoning
  • 7 ounces of duck fat (substitute with goose fat if preferred)
  • 2 teaspoons of fresh rosemary roughly chopped
  • Sea salt flakes to finish
Duck Fat Potatoes ingredients

How to Make Duck Fat Potatoes

Step 1: Start by peeling your potatoes and cutting them into uniform 3-inch chunks to ensure even cooking. Place them in a large pot, cover with cold water, and add 1 tablespoon of table salt. Bring to a boil and simmer until the potatoes are par-cooked, about 10 minutes. They should be just tender on the outside but still firm in the center.

Duck Fat Potatoes steps

Step 2: While the potatoes are simmering, set your oven to preheat at 450°F.

Step 3: In a small saucepan, melt the duck fat over low heat. Add the chopped rosemary to infuse the fat. Keep it on the lowest heat setting just to keep the fat liquid.

Duck Fat Potatoes steps

Step 4: Drain the potatoes and let them steam dry for a moment or two. Then, give them a shake in the pot to rough up the edges (this is the secret to creating more surface area for that ultimate crunch). Sprinkle the semolina and kosher salt over the potatoes, and toss.

Step 5: Carefully take your preheated roasting pan out of the oven and add the infused duck fat. Spread the fat evenly, then add your coated potatoes in a single layer, turning to coat in the fat. Roast in the oven for 20 minutes, then turn the potatoes and continue roasting for another 20-30 minutes. You want them golden.

Duck Fat Potatoes steps

Step 6: Once done, transfer the potatoes to a serving dish and sprinkle with sea salt flakes to taste.

Duck Fat Potatoes featured image

FAQs

Is duck fat unhealthy?

Duck fat, used in moderation, is a heart-healthy fat and similar to olive oil in its benefits.

Is it really necessary to boil potatoes before roasting them?

Yes, to soften them. If you pop them straight in the oven to roast in their raw state, they will burn before they soften. The par boiling is essential partial cooking before roasting.

What does the coating of semolina do to the potatoes?

Tossing the partially cooked potatoes in semolina (and salt) ensures crispiness by adding a tiny crunch to the outside and soaking up any extra moisture.

How to make the potatoes crispier?

Don’t skip the shake on step 4. It will soften the edges a bit and make more surface area for the crispy outside. Two or three shakes back and forth should be enough.

How to store duck fat potatoes?

This is a recipe best prepared and cooked right before serving. If you do have leftovers, store in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Reheat in a preheated oven at 400 degrees until warm. Freezing is not recommended.

Duck Fat Potatoes featured image

Serving Suggestions

These Duck Fat Potatoes work as a stellar side dish to any number of main courses. From a humble hamburger to an elegant grilled steak or lamp chop, they complement a variety of meats beautifully. If you like, serve with dipping sauces: ketchup, honey mustard, or even a spicy remoulade.

Duck Fat Potatoes featured image
Duck Fat Potatoes featured image

Duck Fat Potatoes

5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 25 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 35 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 389 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 3.5 to 4 pounds of Yukon Gold or Russet potatoes peeled and cut into 3-inch chunks
  • 1 tablespoon of table salt for boiling
  • 2 tablespoons of semolina for coating
  • 1.5 teaspoons of kosher salt for seasoning
  • 7 ounces of duck fat substitute with goose fat if preferred
  • 2 teaspoons of fresh rosemary roughly chopped
  • Sea salt flakes to finish

Instructions
 

  • Start by peeling your potatoes and cutting them into uniform 3-inch chunks to ensure even cooking. Place them in a large pot, cover with cold water, and add 1 tablespoon of table salt. Bring to a boil and simmer until the potatoes are par-cooked, about 10 minutes. They should be just tender on the outside but still firm in the center.
  • While the potatoes are simmering, set your oven to preheat at 450°F.
  • In a small saucepan, gently melt the duck fat over low heat. Add the chopped rosemary to infuse the fat. Keep it on the lowest heat setting just to keep the fat liquid.
  • Drain the potatoes and let them steam dry for a moment or two. Then, give them a shake in the pot to rough up the edges (this is the secret to creating more surface area for that ultimate crunch). Sprinkle the semolina and kosher salt over the potatoes, and toss.
  • Carefully take your preheated roasting pan out of the oven and add the infused duck fat. Spread the fat evenly, then add your coated potatoes in a single layer, turning to coat in the fat. Roast in the oven for 20 minutes, then turn the potatoes and continue roasting for another 20-30 minutes. You want them golden.
  • Once done, transfer the potatoes to a serving dish and sprinkle with sea salt flakes to taste.

Nutrition

Calories: 389kcalCarbohydrates: 39gProtein: 5gFat: 25gSaturated Fat: 8gPolyunsaturated Fat: 3gMonounsaturated Fat: 12gCholesterol: 25mgSodium: 1318mgPotassium: 835mgFiber: 3gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 3IUVitamin C: 11mgCalcium: 28mgIron: 2mg
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